2020 Indonesian General Strike

Table of Contents

Preface
Protests & Demonstrations
Police Brutality
Updates

Preface

The Job Creation Law was an act of legislation approved by Parliament on the 5th of October to change the labor system and natural resources management; it amended 79 laws and was supposed to improve bureaucratic efficiency. Unions, workers, and students, however, say that it will hurt workers by reducing severance pay, taking off manual labor restrictions for foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing, and converting monthly salaries to hourly wages.

Organizers began to mobilize for a 3-day national strike beginning on the 6th of October to revoke the new law; dissenters are a coalition of unions, communist parties, and student groups. Police were expected to crack down heavily on the protesters, as hundreds of thousands of people would be taking to the streets.

Protests & Demonstrations

Protests began in the tens of thousands, opposing the Job Creation Law and its impacts on labor and the environment. Protesters centered themselves in Jakarta and other major cities in Sumatra and Sulawesi.

Police Brutality

Police responded immediately and severely to the protests, sending amounts of tear gas comparable to Portland, and beating protesters. Hundreds were injured, but none insofar were reported killed. The President was evacuated from Jakarta to Kalimantan.

Updates

Omnibus Law Protests Continue in Indonesia

Demonstrations across Indonesia continue to rock the country as Parliament refuses to revoke the Omnibus Law, a much-criticized bill that passes neoliberal reforms including deregulation and cutting workers’ rights. Over 800 arrests were made up to the 11th of October, although protests continue across the country.
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Omnibus Law Protests Continue in Indonesia

Day 3 of Indonesian National Strike

The 8th of October national strike was the final day of protest planned against the Job Creation Law, but it appears unlikely that the protests will stop anytime soon. The Parliamentary website has been hacked into by a division of Malay hacktivists, and the riots only intensified since the 7th.
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Day 3 of Indonesian National Strike

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