Santiago Protests Outside of Presidential Palace Against Piñera

Thousands of demonstrators gathered outside of the presidential palace of Chilean President Sebastián Piñera, demanding his resignation as well as that of the entire government. Protesters clashed with police, with dozens of injuries occurring throughout the day.

Protesters first began to gather at the Presidential Palace at around 5:30 P.M., in preparation for the demonstration against Piñera.

Clashes quickly began to occur outside of the University of Chile, with water cannons and tear gas deployed against hundreds of demonstrators by the Carabineros (national police).

Protesters were also attacked in front of the University of Chile and in Ahumada and Alameda in an attempt to make it to the Presidential Palace.

Heavy clashes with water cannons deployed at Ahumada Road, as protesters continued to push to the Presidential Palace.

Tear gas was also seen in use for the first time around the U Metro station in central Santiago.

Demonstrators continued to attempt to break through police lines at Ahumada Road, with tear gas and water cannons continuing to be used against protesters.

At Metro Station U, protesters continued to be attacked by the Carabineros with chemically-tainted water cannons and tear gas.

Demonstrators were not however deterred and continued to pour into the streets in the hundreds in central Santiago, with police shortly after deploying tear gas and chemically tainted water cannons as protesters moved to the central Alameda.

Protesters later managed to beat back the police at the Alameda despite heavy injuries, throwing rocks and other projectiles at the Carabineros and police.

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